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Watashi ga Obasan ni Natte mo

"Watashi ga Obasan ni Natte mo" is the 16th single by Japanese singer/songwriter Chisato Moritaka. Written by Moritaka and Hideo Saitō, the single was released by Warner Music Japan on June 25, 1992.

99 Points of Intersection

99 Points of Intersection: Examples - Pictures - Proofs is a book on constructions in Euclidean plane geometry in which three or more lines or curves meet in a single point of intersection. This book was originally written in German by Hans Walse ...

All Creatures Great and Small

All Creatures Great and Small may refer to: All Creatures Great and Small franchise, a series of books, films and TV shows based on the works of James Herriot All Creatures Great and Small TV series, a BBC television adaptation originally based o ...

Gleason

Gleason, California, former town Gleason, Wisconsin, an unincorporated community William H. Gleason House, historic home in Melbourne, Florida, USA Gleason, West Virginia, an unincorporated community Jackie Gleason Bus Depot, Brooklyn, New York, ...

Kindle

Kindle Entertainment, a childrens television and film production company based in London, England Kindle Banking Systems, a company that produced banking software Kindle Direct Publishing, an e-book publishing unit of Amazon.com Kindle Store, an ...

NGJ

NGJ may refer to: Next Generation Jammer, a program to develop an airborne electronic warfare system, as a replacement for the AN/ALQ-99 found on the EA-18G military aircraft New Games Journalism, a model of New Journalism applied to video game j ...

Green card (disambiguation)

Green card, a warning card against further infractions by a Pride Fighting Championships competitor Green card, a warning card against further infractions by a field hockey player Green card, in Association football, to signal permission to enter ...

Twombly

Twombly may refer to: In people: Cy Twombly 1928–2011, an American abstract artist Carol Twombly, an American calligrapher Voltaire P. Twombly, a recipient of the Medal of Honor Wells Twombly 1935–1977, American sportswriter and author Hamilton M ...

Jonathan Harris (disambiguation)

Jonathan Calt Harris born 1969, American conservative writer and editor Jonathan Harris artist born 1979, internet artist and designer Jonny Harris born 1975, Canadian actor and comedian Jon Harris artist born 1943, English artist, illustrator, a ...

Copy slip

Copy slips or copy strips are small slips of paper which were commonly used to teach calligraphy and penmanship between 1500 and 1920. The strips, which typically measure about 8.5 inches by 3.5 inches, display engraved or handwritten examples of ...

Zapf

Zapf may refer to: Zapf name, a family name Franz Zapf, German museum director Helmut Zapf, German composer Hermann Zapf 1918–2015, German typeface designer, professor, calligrapher, typographer and husband of Gudrun Zapf-von Hesse Zapf Dingbats ...

Hatti

Hatti may refer to the Hittites of ca 1400–1200 BC the Hattians of the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC the areas to the west of the Euphrates controlled by Neo-Hittite kingdoms 1000–700 BC Hatti ; Assyrian URU Ha-at-ti in Bronze Age Anatolia the area of ...

Great Flood (disambiguation)

Great Flood is a phrase used to describe the central event in any catastrophic flood. Some may be of the flood myth, whether historically accurate or mythological, while others are severe floods from around the world. Great Flood may also refer t ...

University of Queensland R.D. Milns Antiquities Museum

The University of Queensland R.D. Milns Antiquities Museum is a collection housed on the St Lucia campus of the university. It was built to further the study of the classical civilisations of Greece, Rome, Egypt, and the Near East by secondary st ...

Silaces

Silaces was a Parthian commander who fought against the Roman general and triumvir Marcus Licinius Crassus. Initially the satrap of Ichnae, a fortress in Mesopotamia, he was defeated and wounded by Crassus forces, and fled to the Parthian court, ...

Sin-gāmil

Sin-gāmil was a king of Uruk during the 18th century BCE, at the time of the Isin-Larsa period. He was the son of Sin-irībam, and Ilum-gāmil, his brother succeeded him. Sin-gāmil is also known from one of this dedication tablets. His son was Sali ...

Pre-Christian

Pre-Christian may refer to: Before Christianization the spread of Christianity Historical paganism denoting various non-Abrahamic religions Historical polytheism the worship of or belief in multiple deities Classical antiquity, a period of histor ...

Junia

Junia may refer to: Junia gens, a Roman gens Three daughters of Servilia, mistress of Caesar, sisters or half sisters of Marcus Junius Brutus Junia Prima Junia Secunda Junia Tertia Junia New Testament person, or Junias, a person mentioned by Paul ...

Testa

Testa may refer to: Testa, Hurwitz & Thibeault, a former Boston law firm Testa surname Trebatius Testa fl. 1st century BC, jurist of ancient Rome Tesch & Stabenow, a German chemical company notable for its role in the Holocaust Trans European Ser ...

Proculeian school

The Proculeians originally took their name from the prominent jurist Proculus, but later came to often be called "Pegasians" after the prominent Proculeian Plotius Pegasus. However the tradition on which the school was based comes from the jurist ...

Apronianus

Apronianus was the name of a number of people from classical antiquity: Flavius Turcius Rufius Apronianus Asterius, aristocrat during the reign of Theoderic the Great in the 5th century CE Cassius Apronianus, Roman senator in the 2nd century CE, ...

Concerto, BWV 525a

The Concerto, BWV 525a, is a trio sonata in C major for violin, cello and basso continuo, based on material otherwise found in Johann Sebastian Bachs first Organ Sonata, BWV 525, and Flute Sonata in A major, BWV 1032. The oldest extant manuscript ...

Philostratus (disambiguation)

Philostratus may refer to any of four members of Philostratus family in ancient Greece: Philostratus III: Philostratus of Lemnos c. 190 – c. 230 AD, a son-in-law and probably nephew of Flavius Philostratus, probably author of the 1st series of Im ...

Sevom Khordad

The Sevom Khordad or 3rd Khordad is an Iranian road-mobile medium range air defense missile system that was first unveiled on 11 May 2014. It is beleived to be an upgraded version of the Raad air defense system and somewhat superior to the other ...

Toll (fee)

Tolls usually had to be paid at strategic locations such as bridges sometimes called a bridge toll or gates. In Europe, the road toll goes back to the practice of the Germanic tribes, who charged fees to travellers if they wanted to cross over mo ...

John de Ramsey

John de Ramsey was an English master mason and architect working in Gothic architecture in the Kingdom of England in the 14th century. He was Master of the Works at Norwich Cathedral in 1304, at which time a new detached belfry was under construc ...

Conca del Naviglio

Conca del Naviglio is a district of Milan, Italy, part of the Zone 1 of Milan. It preserves the remains of the basin and some remains of the Milan amphitheatre. The urban fabric originated around the creation of the Conca di Viarenna in the 15th ...

The Old Furnace

The Old Furnace is a colloquial name given to an historic site in Oakamoor, Staffordshire, England, that supported the development of medieval and post-medieval iron smelting. The furnace was situated in the Churnet Valley in the Staffordshire mo ...

Age of reason (disambiguation)

Age of reason or Age of Enlightenment was an intellectual and philosophical movement that dominated the world of ideas in Europe during the 18th century. Age of reason or Age of Reason may also refer to: Age of Reason album, a 1988 album by John ...

Asiatic Society (disambiguation)

Asiatic Society is a society founded by British in the Indian subcontinent in early 18th century with a view to encourage science, literature and the arts in relation to Asia. It could refer to any of the following: Asiatic Society, Mumbai locate ...

Fit-up

Fit-up refers to the old style of theatre or circus where companies of travelling players or performers would tour from town or village to village in the provinces of Britain and elsewhere, particularly throughout the 19th-century. Taken from the ...

James P. Newton

James P. Newton was a photographer in Memphis, Tennessee. He is noted as the citys first African American professional photographer and as an influential documenter of the citys history. Several of his cabinet card photographs remain including in ...

Hearst

Hearst Castle, a mansion built by William Randolph Hearst in San Simeon, California Hearst, former name of Vista Robles, California Hearst, Ontario, town in Northern Ontario Hearst, California, an unincorporated community in Mendocino County Hear ...

Laura M. Toy

Toy served as a Schoolcraft Community College Trustee from 1979 to 1986. Toy then served on the Livonia City Council from 1987 to 1995. Toy served as Livonia City Treasurer from 1996 to 1998. On November 3, 1998, Toy was elected to the Michigan H ...

Hardy Ivy Park

The namesake for the park is Hardy Ivy, who is generally considered the first person of European descent to settle in what is now Atlanta. According to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the name was chosen to appease the Ivy family after Ivy Stre ...

0s (disambiguation)

The 0s covers the first nine years of the Anno Domini era, which began on January 1st, AD 1 and ended on December 31st, AD 9. 0s may also refer to: The century from 1-99 almost aligned with the 1st century. The plural of 0 The millennium from 1-9 ...

China National Highway 338

China National Highway 338 will run from Haixing to Tianjun. It is one of the new trunk highways proposed in the China National Highway Network Planning.

China National Highway 341

China National Highway 341 will run from Jiaonan in Shandong to Haiyan in Qinghai. It is one of the new trunk highways proposed in the China National Highway Network Planning.

Eugenics wars

Eugenics wars may refer to: In the Star Trek fictional universe, Eugenics Wars is a world war that occurred between 1992 and 1996, in which the progeny of a human genetic engineering project established themselves as supermen and attempted world ...

Bitter Almond Liqueur

Bitter Almond Liqueur, is a Portuguese sweet alcoholic liquor, more specifically from the Algarve region. Clear light yellow in colour and with roughly 20% ABV, it is one of the most well-known liqueurs in its country of origin. Its made from the ...

News Corporation

News Corporation or News Corp may refer to: 21st Century Fox 2013–2019, the legal successor to the original News Corporation News UK, the British subsidiary of News Corp News Corporation 1980–2013, an American multinational mass media corporation ...

U.S. Auto Parts Network

U.S. Auto Parts Network, Inc. or US Auto Parts or USAP, is an American online provider of aftermarket auto parts, including collision parts, engine parts, and performance parts and accessories. The company is headquartered in Torrance, California ...

You Are There (Roberta Gambarini & Hank Jones album)

Suzanne Lorge reviews the album for All About Jazz and gives it 5 out of a possible 5 stars. She says, "This CD promises to be one of the better vocal releases of 2008. Beyond Gambarinis impressive vocals, listeners are advised to pay close atten ...

List of number-one Billboard Latin Albums from the 2020s

The Billboard Top Latin Albums chart, published by Billboard magazine, is a record chart that ranks the performance of Latin music albums in the United States. The data is compiled by Nielsen SoundScan from a sample that includes music stores, mu ...

Limitless (Richard Marx album)

Limitless is the twelfth studio album by American singer/songwriter and record producer/arranger Richard Marx, released on February 7, 2020. It his first studio album since 2014. It was the first time Marx had recorded an album without the consci ...

Rosina (ship)

Several vessels have been named Rosina: Rosina 1798 ship was launched at Stockton-on-Tees. A lightning strike in 1809 while she was in a dockyard set fire to her but was put out. She then sailed for at least a decade more. Rosina 1803 ship was la ...

Prospect Avenue

Prospect Avenue may refer to: Prospect Avenue Brooklyn, New York City Hollywood Boulevard between 1887 and 1910 Prospect Avenue Kansas City, Missouri, a street that runs close to U.S. Route 71

Kansas City Cowboys

Several sports team in Kansas City, Missouri have used the name Cowboys: Kansas City Cowboys 20th century baseball, a 20th-century minor baseball team Kansas City Cowboys NFL, a 1920s National Football League team Kansas City Cowboys National Lea ...

Mound City

Mound City is the name of several places in the United States: Mound City, Illinois Mound City, Arkansas Mound City National Cemetery Mound City, Missouri Mound City National Cemetery Mound City Township, Kansas Big Mound City Mound City, South D ...

Central City (disambiguation)

A central city or core city is the largest or most important city or cities of a metropolitan area. Central city may also refer to: The urban core of a prefecture-level city as opposed to the much larger region it governs A central business distr ...